Asus Xonar sound card frameskip issue

Just a little tidbit of information regarding Xonar sound cards: The ‘GX’ mode, while I dread to think how deeply it hooks into DirectX (considering it crashes several old games), must be enabled for anything which involves certain clocks to not develop awful judder on the video side of things.

Basically if you use ReClock or play osu!, or anything of that sort (high fps/fast reaction games), enable GX mode. Without GX enabled, I’ve found there to be intermittent severe frame skip, which is only visible to the eye and not to any kind of software FPS or frame loss counter.

If you have a Xonar card and a high refresh rate monitor (it’s not very clear at 60hz), compare GX on and off with http://www.prad.de/en/monitore/testsoftware/pixperan.html.

If I remember correctly, with Aero enabled or Vsync on, the issue is not apparent.

DarkElec Release 2

NEW VERSION! http://darkimmortal.com/2012/11/darkelec-release-3/

Finally got DarkELEC to compile successfully with the latest upstream changes from OpenELEC along with a few tweaks that I’ve since forgotten 😛

Observations for this build:

  • Fairly high idle CPU usage (70%+) sadly
  • libCEC works on LG and Sony TVs now, however all input stops working once you begin playing a video (a complete deal-breaker for me personally 🙁 )
  • Built in streaming services still work
  • Overall smoother UI
  • More reliable Wifi
  • Thumbnails aren’t missing/oddly coloured

Download: http://shit.weeaboo.com/darkelec2.zip
Sauce: https://github.com/darkimmortal/DarkELEC
More details: http://darkimmortal.com/2012/05/darkelec-raspberry-pi-optimised-openelec-fork/

DarkELEC – Raspberry Pi optimised OpenELEC fork

NEW VERSION! http://darkimmortal.com/2012/08/darkelec-release-2/

None of the currently available solutions do a perfect job with running XBMC on the Pi, however OpenELEC comes by far the closest, in spite of its locked down nature.

This fork aims to remedy the very few flaws in its implementation and to focus 100% on the Pi, while also sticking to the upstream and incorporating its updates.

Features:

  • Low idle CPU usage (< 15%)
  • Smoother and more responsive
  • Built in XBMC addons: iPlayer, custom fixed version of Demand 5, various unofficial repos
  • iPlayer, 4oD, Demand 5, ITV Player, SportsDevil all fully tested+working
  • Improved wifi connectivity
  • Added test-connman scripts for easy wifi setup (see here)
  • Added wireless_tools (iwconfig etc.)
  • Added rndis_wlan wifi driver (broadcom 4320 chipset)
  • Easy SD card installation script for building from source (./install [block device])

Download pre-built SD Card image: darkelec1.zip (~75MB)
(Fixed partition size at just under 2GB total, you can expand manually with GParted if necessary)

Source: https://github.com/darkimmortal/DarkELEC
(Refer to Building and Installing OpenELEC for Raspberry Pi – expect build issues on anything but a stock debian squeeze i686 install)

Android Reverse WiFi/Mobile AP Tethering

Having tried and failed to get Reverse USB Tethering to work on my Samsung Galaxy S running Android 2.2, I searched for another solution. And here it is: Reverse tethering via WiFi.

This allows you to connect your phone to the internet via a computer with both a WiFi dongle and a separate internet connection.

Requirements:

  • Windows computer with an internet connection and a separate WiFi dongle
  • Android phone with Mobile AP tethering support

Instructions:

  1. Enable Mobile AP on your phone with whatever security settings you wish.
  2. Connect to the phone’s access point using the spare WiFi dongle.
  3. Bridge the connection to the phone and your internet connection via a Windows network bridge.
  4. Bring up a terminal (Terminal Emulator is a great app, otherwise you can use SSH, ADB, etc.) and type:
    su
    netcfg wl0.1 dhcp

    (Your connection may not be named ‘wl0.1’ – run ‘netcfg’ to see a full list)
  5. Try accessing the internet on the phone and ensure the 3G indicator is not lit. You can also check via Wireshark on the host PC and you should see the phone making requests.

It seems to be working perfectly for me so far, and has fulfilled its purpose of allowing me to debug stuff running on my phone using Wireshark. Of course it works for normal internet access too. 😉